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Examples of TV Wall Mount Jobs

Profitable Service Example: How To Make Money Wall Mounting TVs

Are you looking for services you can offer that are profitable, enjoyable,  and that attract quality clients?  Well, you’re in luck.

In this article, I’m going to share a profitable service you can offer on the side or as part of your handyman business – TV wall mount installation.  I also share a video of a recent TV wall mount that I did as a little bonus. 😉

When I first started my handyman business, I had no idea I could make good money mounting TVs.  It really shows how little I knew about this business.  It’s crazy to think how ignorant I was when I first got started.

Anyway, I stumbled upon the opportunity back in the day when I was using Home Advisor to grow my business.

It was one of the services that I could sign up to receive leads for so I tried it out. I didn’t really expect to get many leads to mount TVs, but I was wrong.  As it turned out, there’s a decent amount of demand for mounting TVs and if you can capture some of these inbound leads, it’s easy money.

Once I realized the potential, I quickly started marketing the service on my website using the strategies that I teach in the Handyman Web Academy. It worked, and in 2013 I made about $4,000 just mounting TVs for new customers.  This does not include the money I made when the customers hired me for other projects, which happened often.

Here are some of the benefits of offering TV wall mount installs.

  • Profitability – Even a beginner handyman can easily make $100/hr mounting TVs.  Customers put a high value on it because TV’s are expensive and they think it’s hard.  It’s actually really easy and doesn’t take much time which means you make a solid profit.
  • Attracts good customers – The kind of customer that can afford to mount their TV is likely a going to be a customer that can afford to pay you well for quality service.
  • Hardly any supplies needed – Aside from the mount ,which is usually supplied by the customer, you don’t usually need any supplies unless you’re doing in wall wiring.
  • No specialized tools required

How much should you charge?

Pricing for a TV wall mount is going to vary by situation.  Some customers will provide the mount, some won’t.  Some customers want in-wall wiring and some customers just want it hung on the wall.

I typically do flat rate pricing for TV wall mounts and my pricing starts at $100 for a basic installation.  If they need a mount or any additional components, that’s extra.  I personally wouldn’t recommend going any lower than a hundred bucks, though.

For the job shown in the video below I ended up charging about $325 to mount two TVs to metal studs and hide the wires in wire molding.

What materials do you need?

TV Wall Mount – Obviously, if the customer doesn’t provide the wall mount, you’ll need to pick one up.  If you buy one at Home Depot, expect to pay about $100 for a tilting wall mount.  However, you can get them much cheaper online (like $30).

Wire Molding – I like to keep a pack of this peel and stick wire molding on me for these jobs in case the customer wants the wires cleaned up but doesn’t want to pay for in wall wiring.

Electrical Kit – If your customers want in-wall wiring (and assuming you can offer this service legally), you’ll need some electrical supplies.   Another option would be to use a kit that doesn’t require you to tap into the existing electrical system, but I’m unsure if you need an license to install these.  One of those grey areas!

How to market these services?

The best way to advertise for TV wall mounts is online marketing.  Successful online marketing allows you to capture the leads while they’re hot.  Ideally, you’re going to want to be found when somebody googles the term “Tv wall mount install” or a similar keyword.

If you want to get started offering this service right away, post an ad on craigslist.  If you really want to capture a lot of these leads you’re going to need to implement some more advanced online marketing.

To learn the marketing strategy that I use to generate TV wall mount leads and dozens of other profitable services, click here.

Wall Mounting Job Example

Here’s a video of a recent job I did for one of my commercial clients.  I decided to turn it into a YouTube how-to video as a little marketing test.  Enjoy!

Did you find this article helpful or insightful?  If so, share it with your friends!  They’ll like it, too!

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  • James Mason March 22, 2014

    Hey Dan

    Great quality video, very clear and concise. Thanks for showing a few of the different fasteners you use.

    Cheers James.

  • mark peel March 24, 2014

    Great video as it on “you tube” i can access it better with its “close caption” switch (subtitles for us in UK) look forward to more !!

  • Lorenzo March 24, 2014

    Great info Dan! I started offering this a few years ago and it’s a great way to get a foot in the door of a new client. I offer a flat rate since my mounts are around $30, and come with an hdmi cable, I add face plate covers from HD, and my first visit with a client pays $50 an hour. Definitely a Handyman must!

  • Jim March 25, 2014

    Big D,
    Good tip on locating the center of the steel stud. Video was clear and concise.
    Looking forward to the web academy. Thanks!
    Jim

    • Dan Perry March 25, 2014

      Thanks Jim!

  • PATRICK FEARICK March 26, 2014

    Thanks for tip on those types of anchors. Will keep in mind for future installs.

  • Bob Stahnke April 2, 2014

    Great video on installing the wall mounts. However that is the easy part. Now what about the cables. Some folks are very picky.

  • Lloyd April 16, 2014

    Nice Video. I just did a metal stud install and used self drilling sheet metal screws. (I did make a small starter-hole to facilitate the start) Lots of ways to skin a cat and they worked really well. I will also use these fasteners to my bag of tricks as well.

  • Bobby Wolfe January 20, 2015

    I would love to watch the video but there seems to be something wrong with the link. Additionally, I was wondering if anyone was familiar with the legal side of doing “in-wall” wiring as opposed to hiding external wiring with molding kits.

    • Dan Perry January 20, 2015

      Bobby,

      I was able to watch the video just fine. What kind of device were you using?

      As far as the legal question. It’s different in every state. Go to your state’s contractor’s board website and read up on the laws and licensing requirements to perform electrical work.

      Dan

  • Miguel January 7, 2016

    Great video, Dan. Mounting TVs sounds like a fast and easy way for a handyman to add more business.

  • Scott January 28, 2016

    Hanging TVs is a main staple in my business. I have installed over 1000 in the last 10 years. Dan has some solid stuff. I have purchased his coarse and learned a lot. I charge $85 an hour but like Dan I charge a flat fee for basic installation at $100, I sell mounts for about $75-$250 depending on the type. If I need to conceal the wires I charge another $75 or $150 for a power bridge. Custom installations are time and material such as pulling the wires to a closet or mounting on stone. With a strong key word behind this service it’s a great way to get into the home to do future work.

    • Dan Perry January 29, 2016

      Hey Scott! Thanks for sharing this and the shoutout for my course.

  • Wade K. February 6, 2016

    Hey Dan, great info as always. One question I have is how do you hang a large tv (like 55″ or bigger) if you work by yourself? Haven’t run into this yet, but like to plan ahead. Thanks

    • Dan Perry February 7, 2016

      It takes about the same amount of time regardless of the size of TV. And, as unusual as this might sound, I just get the homeowner to help me lift the TV (unless they can’t) when it comes time. This isn’t a problem because I ask the size of the TV before I take the job and let them know that I’m only one person and I’ll need to charge more to bring a second, but if they are strong an able then 30 seconds of their help will save them $50.

      There may be some liability issues with this, especially if THEY drop the TV, but it’s low risk in my opinion and I alway take the harder side to lift.

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